Automating Source IP Address updates on an Azure Network Security Group RDP Access Rule

Recently I’ve migrated a bunch of Virtual Box Virtual Machines to Azure as detailed here. These VM’s are in Resource Groups with a Network Security Group associated that restricts access to them for RDP based on a source TCPIP address. All good practice. However from a usability perspective, when I want to use these VM’s, I’m not always in the same location, and rarely on a connection with a static IP address.

This post details a simple little script that;

  • Has a couple of variables associated with a Resource Group, Network Security Group, Virtual Machine Name and an RDP Configuration File associated with the VM
  • Gets the public IP Address of the machine I’m running the script from
  • Prompts for Authentication to Azure, and retrieves the NSG associated with the Resource Group
  • Compares the Source IP Address in the ‘RDP’ Inbound Rule to my current IP Address. If they aren’t a match it updates the Source IP Address to be my current public IP Address
  • Starts the Virtual Machine configured at the start of the script
  • Launches Remote Desktop using the RDP Configuration file

The Script

Here’s the raw script. Update lines 2-8 for your environment and away you go. Simple but useful as is often the way.

Migrating a VirtualBox (Linux) Windows VDI Virtual Machines to Azure

Overview

Over the years I’ve transitioned through a number of laptops and for whatever reason they never fully get put out to pasture. Two specific laptops are used semi-regularly for functions associated with a few virtual machines they hold. Over the last 10 years or so, I’ve been a big proponent of VirtualBox. It’s footprint and functionality aligned with my needs. The downside these days is needing to sometimes carry two laptops just to use an application or two contained inside a Virtual Machine on VirtualBox.

It’s 2017 and time to get with the times. Dedicate an evening of working through the process of migrating those VM’s.

DISCLAIMER and CONSIDERATIONS Keep in mind that if you are migrating legacy operating systems, you’ll need a method to remote into them once they are in Azure. Check the configuration of them before  you convert and migrate them. Do they have firewalls? Is the network interface on the VM configured for dynamic or static addressing? Do the VM have remote access configured, VNC, RDP, SSH. As they are also likely to be less secure my process below includes a Network Security Group as part of the Azure Resource Group with no rules specified. You’ll need to add some inbound rules for the method you’ll be using to remote into your Virtual Machine. And I STRONGLY suggest locking those rules down to a single host or home subnet.

The VM Conversion Process

This blog post covers the migration of a Windows Virtual Machine in VDI format from VirtualBox on SUSE Linux to Azure.

  • With the VM Started un-install the VBox Guest Additions from the virtual machine

RemoveExtensions2

  • Shutdown the VM
  • In VirtualBox Manager select the VM and Settings
    1. Select Storage. If the VBoxGuestAdditions CD/DVD is attached then remove it.
    2. Take note of the VM’s disk(s) location (WinXPv2.vdi in my case) and naming. Mine just had a single hard disk. You’ll need the path for the conversion utility.

RemoveVBoxAdditions

RemoveAdditionsDVD

  • Virtual Box includes a utility named vboxmanage. We can use that to convert the VM virtual hard disk from VDI to VHD format. Simply run vboxmanage clonehd –format VHD –variant Fixed
    • You will need to make sure you have enough space on your laptop hard disk for the VHD which will be about the same size as your VDI Hard Disk
      • If you don’t on Linux you’ll get a slightly cryptic message like
        • Could not create the clone medium (VERR_EOF)
        • VBOX_E_FILE_ERROR (0x80bb0004)
      • the –variant Fixed switch is not shown in the virtual disk conversion screenshot (three images further down the page). One of my other VM’s was Dynamic. Size needs to be Fixed for the VHD to be associated with a VM in Azure
      • Below shows determining an existing disk that is Dynamic and needs to be converted to Fixed

DynamicDisk

  • Below shows determining an existing disk that is Fixed and doesn’t need to be converted

FixedDisk

  • Converting the VDI virtual disk to VHD

Convert60Percent

Preparing our Azure Environment for our new Virtual Machine

  • Whilst the conversion was taking place I logged into the Azure Portal and created a new Resource Group for my VM to go into. I also created a new Storage Account in that Resource Group to put the VM’s VHD into. Basically I’m keeping these specific individual VM’s that serve a very specific purpose in their own little compartment.

RGandSG

  • Using the fantastic Azure Storage Explorer which works on Linux, Mac and Windows I created a Blob Container in my newly created Storage Account named vhds.

CreateBlobContainer

Upload the Converted Virtual Hard Disk

  • By now my virtual disk had converted. Using the Azure Storage Explorer I uploaded my converted virtual disk. NOTE Make sure you have the ‘upload vhd/vhdx files as Page Blobs’ selected. 

UploadVHD

For a couple of other VM’s I wrote a little PowerShell script to upload the VHD’s to blob storage.

Create the Azure VM

The following script follows on from the Resource Group, Storage Account and the Virtual Machine Virtual Disk we created and uploaded to Azure and creates the VM to attached to the virtual disk.

All the variables are up front, we create the Network Security Group, Subnet and Virtual Network. Then the Public IP and Network Interface. Finally we define the details for the VM with the networking and the uploaded VHD before creating the VM.

And we’re done. VM created and started.

VMCreated
Happy days and good bye to a number of old laptops.

How to create an Azure Function App to Simultaneously Start|Stop all Virtual Machines in a Resource Group

Just on a year ago I wrote this blog post that detailed a method to “Simultaneously Start|Stop all Azure Resource Manager Virtual Machines in a Resource Group”. It’s a simple script that I use quite a lot and I’ve received a lot of positive feedback on it.

One year on though and there are a few enhancements I’ve been wanting to make to it. Namely;

  • host the script in an environment that is a known state. Often I’m authenticated to different Azure Subscriptions, my personal, my employers and my customers.
  • prioritize the order the virtual machines startup|shutdown
  • allow for a delay between starting each VM (to account for environments where the VM’s have roles that have cross dependencies; e.g A Domain Controller, an SQL Server, Application Servers). You want the DC to be up and running before the SQL Server, and so forth
  • and if I do all those the most important;
    • secure it so not just anyone can start|stop my environments at their whim

Overview

This blog post is the first that executes the first part of implementing the script in an environment that is a known state aka implementing it as an Azure Function App. This won’t be a perfect implementation as you will see, but will set the foundation for the other enhancements. Subsequent posts (as I make time to develop the enhancements) will add the new functionality. This post covers;

  • Creating the Azure Function App
  • Creating the foundation for automating management of Virtual Machines in Azure using Azure Function Apps
  • Starting | Stopping all Virtual Machines in an Azure Resource Group

Create a New Azure Function App

First up we are going to need a Function App. Through your Azure Resource Manager Portal create a new Function App.

For mine I’ve created a new Resource Group and a new Storage Account as this solution will flesh out over time and I’d like to keep everything organised.

Now that we have the Azure App Plan setup, create a New PowerShell HTTP Trigger Function App.

Give it a name and hit Create.

 

Create Deployment Credentials

In order to get some of the dependencies into the Azure Function we need to create deployment credentials so we can upload them. Head to the Function App Settings and choose Go to App Service Settings.

Create a login and give it a password. Record the FTP/Deployment username and the FTP hostname along with your password as you’ll need this in the next step.

Upload our PowerShell  Modules and Dependencies

Just as my original PowerShell script did I’m using the brilliant Invoke Parallel Powershell Script from Rambling Cookie Monster. Download it from that link and save it to your local machine.

Connect to your Azure Function App using your favourite FTP Client using the credentials you created earlier. I’m using WinSCP. Create a new sub-directory under /site/wwwroot/ named “bin” as shown below.

Upload the Invoke-Parallel.ps1 file from wherever you extracted it to on your local machine to the bin folder you just created in the Function App.

We are also going to need the AzureRM Powershell Modules. Download those via Powershell to your local machine (eg. Save-Module -Name AzureRM -Path c:\temp\azurerm). There are a lot of modules obviously and you’re not going to need them all. At a minimum for this solution you’ll need;

  • AzureRM
  • AzureRM.profile
  • AzureRM.Compute

Upload them under the bin directory also as shown below.

Test that our script dependencies are accessible

Now that we have our dependent modules uploaded let’s test that we can load and utilise them. Below is commands to load the Invoke-Parallel script and test that it has loaded by getting the Help.

# Load the Invoke-Parallel Powershell Script
. "D:\home\site\wwwroot\RG-Start-Stop-VirtualMachines\bin\Invoke-Parallel.ps1"

# See if it is loaded by getting some output
Get-Help Invoke-Parallel -Full

Put those lines into the code section, hit Save and Run and select Logs to see the output. If successful you’ll see the help. If you don’t you probably have a problem with the path to where you put the Invoke-Parallel script. You can use the Kudu Console from the Function App Settings to get a command line and verify your path.

Mine worked successfully. Now to test our AzureRM Module Loads. Update the Function to load the AzureRM Profile PSM as per below and test you have your path correct.

# Import the AzureRM Powershell Module
import-module 'D:\home\site\wwwroot\RG-Start-Stop-VirtualMachines\bin\AzureRM.profile\2.4.0\AzureRM.Profile.psm1'
Get-Help AzureRM

Success. Fantastic.

Create an Azure Service Principal

In order to automate the access and control of the Azure Virtual Machines we are going to need to connect to Azure using a Service Principal with the necessary permissions to manage the Virtual Machines.

The following script does just that. You only need to run this as part of the setup for the Azure Function so we have an account we can use for our automation tasks. Update line 6 for your naming and the password you want to use. I’m assigning the Service Principal the “DevTest Labs User” Azure Role (Line 17) as that allows the ability to manage the Virtual Machines. You can find a list of the available roles here.

Take note of the key outputs from this script. You will need to note the;

  • ApplicationID
  • TenantID

I’m also securing the credential that has the permissions to Start|Stop the Virtual Machines using the example detailed here in Tao’s post.

For reference here is an example to generate the keyfile. Update your path in line 5 if required and make sure the password you supply in line 18 matches the password you supplied for the line in the script (line 6) when creating the Security Principal.

Take note of the password encryption string from the end of the script to pair with the ApplicationID and TenantID from the previous steps. You’ll need these shortly in Application Settings.

Additional Dependencies

I created another sub-directory under the function app site named ‘keys’ again using WinSCP. Upload the passkey file created above into that directory.

Whilst we’re there I also created a “logs” directory for any erroneous output (aka logfiles created when you don’t specify them) from the invoke-parallel script.

Application Variables

Using the identity information you have created and generated we will populate variables on the Function App, Application Settings that we can then leverage in our Function App. Go to your Azure Function App, Application Settings and add an application setting (with the respective values you have gathered in the previous steps) for;

  • AzureAutomationPWD
  • AzureAutomationAppID
  • AzureAutomationTennatID (bad speed typing there)

Don’t forget to click Save up the top of the Application Settings screen.

 

The Function App Script

Below is the sample script for your testing purposes. If you plan to use something similar in a production environment you’ll want to add more logging and error handling.

Testing the Function

Select the Test option from the right-hand side pane and update the request body for what the Function takes (mode and resourcegroup) as below.   Select Run and watch the logs. You will need to select Expand to get more screen real estate for them.

You will see the VM’s enumerate then the script starting them all up. My script has a 30 second timeout for the Invoke-Parallel Runspace as the VM’s will take longer than 30 seconds to startup. And you pay for use, so we want to keep this lean. Increase the timeout if you have more VM’s or latency that doesn’t see all your VM’s state transitioning.

Checking in the Azure Portal I can see my VM’s all starting up (too fast on the screenshot for the spfarm-mim host).

 

Sample Remote PowerShell Invoke Script

Below is a sample PowerShell script that is remotely calling the Azure Function and providing the info the Function takes (mode and resourcegroup) the same as we did in the Test Request Body script in the Azure Function Portal.  This time to stop the VMs.

Looking in the Azure Portal and we can see all the VMs shutting down.

 

Summary

A foundational implementation of an Azure Function App to perform orchestration of Azure Virtual Machines.

The Function App is rudimentary in that the script exits (as described in the Runspace timeout) after 30 seconds which is prior to the VMs fully returning after starting|stopping. This is because the Function App will timeout after 5mins anyway.

Now to workout the enhancements to it.

Finally, yes I have renewed/changed the Function Key so no-one else can initiate my Function 🙂

Follow Darren Robinson on Twitter

Using Azure Functions with the Lithnet MIIS Automation Powershell Module to query your Microsoft Identity Manager Metaverse

This is the 2nd blog continuing on from this post which is an introduction to using Azure Functions with the Lithnet FIM/MIM Powershell Modules. If you haven’t read that one please do so to get up to speed before this one as it has more detail around the setup.

Overview

This post details similar functionality to the first post but with integration to the FIM/MIM Synchronisation Server and the FIM/MIM Metaverse rather than the FIM/MIM Service.

The solution is based around an Azure Function that;

  • takes a HTTP WebRequest that contains a payload with the ObjectType, AttributeName and AttributeValue to search for in the Metaverse
  • The Azure Function uses Remote Powershell to call the Lithnet MIIS Automation Powershell Module installed on the FIM/MIM Sync Server
  • The Lithnet Powershell Module takes the query from the Azure Function, executes the query and returns the result to the Azure Function and the requesting client
  • Note: My MIM Infrastructure is all located in Azure so there are configuration steps in this solution to allow access into my Azure environment. If your FIM/MIM infrastructure is elsewhere you’ll need to transpose the appropriate firewall rules for your architecture

Let’s get started.

Prerequisites

The prerequisites for this solution are;

  • An Azure Tenant
  • FIM/MIM Sync Server (as per the diagram above) with data in your Metaverse from a connected directory service (such as Active Directory)
  • I’ll also be using the awesome Lithnet MIIS Powershell Module from here for Microsoft FIM/MIM from Ryan Newington. A fantastic contribution to the FIM/MIM community
    • You’ll need to download and install it on your FIM/MIM Synchronisation Server. This differs from the Lithnet Module from the first post in this series as this one is specific to the Metaverse not the FIM/MIM Service.

Enable Powershell Remoting on the FIM/MIM Sync Server

On the FIM/MIM Sync Server where we will be sending requests from the Function App we need to enable Powershell Remoting. This is so we can leverage the Lithnet MIIS Automation Powershell module (that is a prerequisite to be installed on your FIM/MIM Sync Server).

On the FIM/MIM Synchronisation Server open Powershell (as Administrator) and execute the command  Enable-PSRemoting -Force 

 

Test from another server in your network that you can access the MIM Sync Server. I did this from my MIM Service Server.

 

PSRemote Inbound Security Rule (Azure NSG)

Using Powershell Remote means we need to have an incoming rule into the Azure Network where my MIM Sync Server is located to allow connections from Azure Functions to my MIM Sync Server. Create an Inbound Rule in your Azure Network Security Group for TCP Port 5986 as per the rule below.

 

Create a Self Signed Cert on the FIM/MIM Sync Server

To secure the connection using Remote Powershell we will secure the HTTPS connection with a certificate. This is because the Azure Function is not a member of the domain where your FIM/MIM Sync Server is located. In this example I’m using a self-signed certificate.

In Powershell (as Administrator) on your FIM/MIM Sync Server run the following command where the DNSName is the DNS name of your FIM/MIM Sync that will resolve from Azure Functions to your FIM/MIM Sync server.

New-SelfSignedCertificate -DnsName mymimsyncserver.westus.cloudapp.azure.com -CertStoreLocation Cert:\LocalMachine\My

Create a Remote Powershell HTTPS Listener

Copy the thumbprint from the self-signed certificate above and use it along with the DNS name of your FIM/MIM Sync Server to run the following command in an Administrator command prompt on your FIM/MIM Sync Server.

winrm create winrm/config/Listener?Address=*+Transport=HTTPS @{Hostname=”mymimsyncserver.westus.cloudapp.azure.com”;CertificateThumbp
rint=”536E41D6089F35ABCDEFD8C52BE754EFF0B279B”}

 

Allow Powershell Remote (HTTPS) through your firewall on your FIM/MIM Sync Server

In an Administrator command prompt run the following command to create a new inbound firewall rule for the Remote Powershell session from your Azure Function.

netsh advfirewall firewall add rule name="WinRM-HTTPS" dir=in localport=5986 protocol=TCP action=allow

Check that the new firewall rule was created successfully.

 

Create your HTTP Request Function

Create a new HTTP Trigger Function choosing Powershell as the language. More detailed steps to do this is in the first post in this series here.

Search FIM/MIM Metaverse Function App Script

Here is the base script to get you started. This differs a little from the first blog post example in that I’ve secured the username and password for connection to my MIM Sync Server. Details on how to do that are also linked to in the first blog post.

Also in this example I’m running Remote Powershell to execute the command on the FIM/MIM Sync Server as that is where the Lithnet MIIS Automation Powershell Module is installed and needs to run.

The following script;

  • Takes an HTTP request with Object Type, AttributeName, AttributeValue
  • It uses a Script Block to take the input variables from the HTTP request and perform a a Powershell Remote command (in this example Get-MVObject)
  • Returns the object to the output

Save the function once you’ve added the script (and updated it for your credentials, target FIM/MIM Sync Server etc).

Bring up the Test dialog and give the script some input values in the Request Body that will result in a successful query result from your Metaverse. Select Run. If you’ve done everything correctly you’ll see an object returned from the Metaverse.

Test the Function App

 

Execute the Azure Function from an HTTP Trigger

Now lets try it remotely. Here is a quick Powershell query to the Azure Function using the Powershell Invoke Rest Method using the same input to the Azure Function. And huzzah a returned object.

Summary

This concept provides a framework to allow a plethora of possibilities all possible through a combination of Azure Functions and the Lithnet MIIS Automation PS Module. The Lithnet MIIS PS Module provides all the functionality you get from being on the MIM Sync Server, but now you can retrieve information remotely or trigger functions remotely.

Follow Darren on Twitter @darrenjrobinson

 

 

 

Automating the simultaneous deployment of AzureRM Virtual Machines for a development environment

This post is details my method for automating the creation of AzureRM virtual machines for use in a development environment. I’m using this process to quickly standup an environment for testing configurations on.

In summary this process;

  • parallel creation of the AzureRM Virtual Machines
  • All machines have the same configuration
    • NIC, Disks etc
  • All machines are created in a new Resource Group, with associated Virtual Network

Simultaneous Creating the AzureRM Virtual Machines for MIM 2016

For my MIM 2016 Lab I’m going to create 5 Virtual Machines. Their roles are;

  • Active Directory Domain Controllers (2)
  • MIM 2016 Portal Servers (2)
  • MIM 2016 Synchronization Server & collocated SQL Server (1)

In order to stand up the Virtual Machines as quickly as possible I spawn the VM Create process in parallel leveraging the brilliant Invoke-Parallel Powershell Script from Cookie.Monster just as I did for my Simultaneous Start|Stop all AzureRM VM’s script detailed here.

VM Creation Script

In my script at the bottom of this post I haven’t included the ‘invoke-parallel.ps1’. The link for it is in the paragraph above. You’ll need to either reference it at the start of your script, or include it in your script. If you want to keep it all together in a single script include it like I have in the screenshot below.

Parts you’ll need to edit

The first part of the script defines what, where and names associated with the development environment. Where will the lab be deployed (‘Australia East’), what will be the Resource Group name (‘MIM2016-Dev10’), the virtual network name in the resource group (‘MIM-Net10’), the storage account name (‘mimdev16021610’). Update each of these for the name you’ll be using for your environment.

#Global Variables
# Where do we want to put the VM’s
$global:locName ‘Australia East’
# Resource Group name
$global:rgName ‘MIM2016-Dev10’
# Virtual Network Name
$global:virtNetwork ‘MIM-Net10’
# Storage account names must be between 3 and 24 characters in length and use numbers and lower-case letters only
$global:stName ‘mimdev16021610’
# VMName
$global:NewVM $null

The VM’s that will be deployed are added to an array. The names used here will become the ComputerName for each VM. Change for the number of machines and the names you want.

# MIM Servers to Auto Deploy
$VMRole = @()
$VMRole += ,(‘MIMPortal1’)
$VMRole += ,(‘MIMPortal2’)
$VMRole += ,(‘MIMSync’)
$VMRole += ,(‘ADDC1’)
$VMRole += ,(‘ADDC2’)

The script will then prompt you to authN to AzureRM.

# Authenticate to the Azure Portal
Add-AzureRmAccount

The script will then prompt you provide a username and password that will be associated with each of the VM’s.

# Get the UserID and Password info that we want associated with the new VM’s.
$global:cred Get-Credential -Message “Type the name and password for the local administrator account that will be created for your new VM(s).”

The Resource Group will be created. The environment subnet and virtual network will be created in the resource group.
# Create Resource Group
New-AzureRmResourceGroup -Name $rgName -Location $locName
# Create RG Storage Account
$storageAcc New-AzureRmStorageAccount -ResourceGroupName $rgName -Name $stName -Type “Standard_GRS” -Location $locName
# Create RG Subnet
$singleSubnet New-AzureRmVirtualNetworkSubnetConfig -Name singleSubnet -AddressPrefix 10.0.0.0/24
# Create RG Network
$global:vnet New-AzureRmVirtualNetwork -Name $virtNetwork -ResourceGroupName $rgName -Location $locName -AddressPrefix 10.0.0.0/16 -Subnet $singleSubnet

A configuration for each of the VM’s that we listed in the array earlier will be created and added to a new array $VMConfig

Update the -VMSize “Standard_A1” for a different Azure VM Spec and  DiskSizeInGB for a different data disk size.

# VM Config for each VM
$VMConfig = @()
# Create VMConfigs and add to an array
foreach ($NewVM in $VMRole) {
# ******** Create IP and Network for the VM ***************************************
# *****We do this upfront before the bulk create of the VM**************


$pip New-AzureRmPublicIpAddress -Name $NewVM-IP1″ -ResourceGroupName $rgName -Location $locName -AllocationMethod Dynamic
$nic New-AzureRmNetworkInterface -Name $NewVM-NIC1″ -ResourceGroupName $rgName -Location $locName -SubnetId $vnet.Subnets[0].Id -PublicIpAddressId $pip.Id
$vm New-AzureRmVMConfig -VMName $NewVM -VMSize “Standard_A1”
$vm Set-AzureRmVMOperatingSystem -VM $vm -Windows -ComputerName $NewVM -Credential $cred -ProvisionVMAgent -EnableAutoUpdate
$vm Set-AzureRmVMSourceImage -VM $vm -PublisherName MicrosoftWindowsServer -Offer WindowsServer -Skus 2012-R2-Datacenter -Version “latest”
$vm Add-AzureRmVMNetworkInterface -VM $vm -Id $nic.Id
# VM Disks. Deploying an OS and a Data Disk for each
$osDiskUri $storageAcc.PrimaryEndpoints.Blob.ToString() “vhds/WindowsVMosDisk$NewVM.vhd”
$DataDiskUri $storageAcc.PrimaryEndpoints.Blob.ToString() “vhds/WindowsVMDataDisk$NewVM.vhd”
$vm Set-AzureRmVMOSDisk -VM $vm -Name “windowsvmosdisk” -VhdUri $osDiskUri -CreateOption fromImage
$vm Add-AzureRmVMDataDisk -VM $vm -Name “windowsvmdatadisk” -VhdUri $DataDiskUri -CreateOption Empty -Caching ‘ReadOnly’ -DiskSizeInGB 10 -Lun 0

# Add the Config to an Array
$VMConfig += ,($vm)
# ******** End NEW VM ***************************************
}

And finally BAM, we let it loose. Using the Invoke-Parallel script each of the VM’s are created in AzureRM simultaneously.

# In Parallel Create all the VM’s
$VMConfig Invoke-Parallel -ImportVariables -ScriptBlockNew-AzureRmVM -ResourceGroupName $rgName -Location $locName -VM $_ }

The screenshot below is near the end of the create VM process. The MIMPortal1 VM that was first in the $VMConfig array is finished and the others are close behind.

The screenshot below shows all resources in the resource group. The Storage Account, the Network, each VM, its associated NIC and Public IP Address.

For me all that (including authN to AzureRM and providing the ‘username’ and ‘password’ for the admin account associated with each VM) executed in just under 13 minutes. Nice.

The full script? Sure thing, here it is.

Follow Darren Robinson on Twitter

Simultaneously Start|Stop all Azure Resource Manager Virtual Machines in a Resource Group

Problem

How many times have you wanted to Start or Stop all Virtual Machines in an Azure Resource Group ? For me it seems to be quite often, especially for development environment resource groups. It’s not that difficult though. You can just enumerate the VM’s then cycle through them and call ‘Start-AzureRMVM’ or ‘Start-AzureRMVM’. However, the more VM’s you have, that approach running serially as PowerShell does means it can take quite some time to complete. Go to the Portal and right-click on each VM and start|stop ?

There has to be a way of starting/shutting down all VM’s in a Resource Group in parallel via PowerShell right ?

Some searching and it seems common to use Azure Automation and Workflow’s to accomplish it. But I don’t want to run this on schedule or necessarily mess around with Azure Automation for development environments, or have to connected to the portal and kickoff the workflow.

What I wanted was a script that was portable. That lead me to messing around with ‘ScriptBlocks’ and ‘Start-Job’ functions in PowerShell. Passing variables in for locally hosted jobs running against Azure though was painful. So I found a quick clean way of doing it, that I detail in this post.

Solution

I’m using the brilliant Invoke-Parallel Powershell Script from Cookie.Monster, to in essence multi-thread and run in parallel the Virtual Machine ‘start’ and ‘stop’ requests.

In my script at the bottom of this post I haven’t included the ‘invoke-parallel.ps1’. The link for it is in the paragraph above. You’ll need to either reference it at the start of your script, or include it in your script. If you want to keep it all together in a single script include it like I have in the screenshot below.

My rudimentary PowerShell script takes two parameters;

  1. Power state. Either ‘Start’ or ‘Stop’
  2. Resource Group. The name of the Azure Resource Group containing the Virtual Machines you are wanting to start/stop. eg. ‘RG01’

<

p style=”background:white;”>Example: .\AzureRGVMPowerGo.ps1 -power ‘Start’ -azureResourceGroup ‘RG01’ or PowerShell .\AzureRGVMPowerGo.ps1 -power ‘Start’ -azureResourceGroup ‘RG01’

Note: If you don’t have a session to Azure in your current environment, you’ll be prompted to authenticate.

Your VM’s will simultaneously start/stop.

What’s it actually doing ?

It’s pretty simple. The script enumerates the VM’s in the Resource Group you’ve specified. It looks to see the status of the VM’s (Running or Deallocated) that is the inverse of the ‘Power’ state you’ve specified when running the script. It’ll start stopped VM’s in the Resource Group when you run it with ‘Start’ or it will stop all started VM’s in the Resource Group when you run it with ‘Stop’. Simples.

This script could also easily be updated to do other similar tasks. Like, delete all VM’s in a Resource Group.

Here it is

Enjoy.

Follow Darren Robinson on Twitter