Integration of Microsoft Identity Manager with Azure Platform-as-a-Service Services

Overview

This isn’t an out of the box solution. This is a bespoke solution that takes a number of elements and puts them together in a unique way. I’m not expecting anyone to implement this specific solution (but you’re more than welcome to) but to take inspiration from it to implement solutions relevant to your environment(s). This post supports a presentation I did to The MIM Team User Group on 14 June 2017.

This post describes a solution that;

  • Leverages an Azure WebApp (NodeJS) to present a simple website. That site can be integrated easily in the FIM/MIM Portal
  • The NodeJS website leverages an Azure Function App to get a list of users from the FIM/MIM Synchronization Server and allows the user to use typeahead functionality to find the user they want to generate a FIM/MIM object report on
  • On selection of a user, a request will be sent to another Azure Function App to generate and return the report to the user in a new browser window

This is shown graphically below.

 

Report Request UI

The NodeJS WebApp is integrated into the FIM/MIM portal. Bootstrap Typeahead is used to find the user to generate a report on. The Typeahead userlist if fulfilled by an Azure Function into the MIM Sync Metaverse. The Generate Report button fires off a call to FIM/MIM via another Azure Function into the MIM Sync and MIM Service to generate the report.

The returned report opens in a new tab in the users browser. The report contains details of the FIM/MIM connectors the user is represented on.

The values of all attributes for the users hologram from the Metaverse are displayed along with the MA the value came from and the last modified date.

Finally the metadata report from the MIM Service MA Connector Space and the MIM Service.

Prerequisites

These are numerous, but I’ve previously posted about them. You will need;

I encourage you to digest those posts to understand how to configure the prerequisites for this solution.

Additional Solution Requirements

To bring all the individual components together, there are a few additional tasks to enable this solution.

  • Enable CORS on your Azure Function App Configuration (see details further below)
  • If you want to display User Object Photos as part of the report, you will likely need to synchronize them into FIM/MIM from an authoritative source (e.g. Office365/Exchange Online)   Checkout this post  and additional details further below
  • In order to embed the NodeJS WebApp into the FIM/MIM Portal, this post provides the details. Change the target URL from PowerBI URL to your NodeJS site
  • Object Report Request WebApp (see below for sample site)

Azure Functions Cross Origin Resource Sharing (CORS)

You will need to configure CORS to allow the NodeJS WebApp to access the Azure Functions (from both local and Azure). Reflect your port number if it is different from 3000, and use the DNS name for your Azure WebApp.

Sample UI NodeJS HTML

Here is a sample HTML file for your NodeJS WebApp with the UI to provide Input for LoginID fulfilled by the NodeJS Javascript file further below.

Sample UI NodeJS JavaScript

The following NodeJS JavaScript supports the HTML UI above. It populates the LoginID typeahead box and takes the Submit Report button to fulfill the report for the desired object(s). Yes if you use the UI to select (individually) multiple different objects all will be returned in their separate output windows.

As the HTML file above indicates you will need to obtain and make available as part of your NodeJS project the typeahead.bundle.js library.

Azure PowerShell Trigger Function App for AccountNames Lookup

The following Azure Function takes the call from the load of the NodeJS WebApp to populate the typeahead userlist.

Azure PowerShell Trigger Function App for User Object Report

Similar in structure to the Username List Lookup Azure Function above, but in the ScriptBlock you embed the Report Generation Script that is detailed here. Modify for what you want to report on.

Photos in the Report

If you want to display images in your report, you will need to determine if the user has an image during the MV metadata report generation part of the script. Add the following lines (updating for the name of your Image attribute; mine is named EXOPhoto) after the Try {} Catch {} in this section $obj = @() ; foreach ($attr in $attributes.Keys)

 # Display the Objects Photo rather than Base64 string
 if ($attr.equals("EXOPhoto")){
     $objectphoto = "<img src=$([char]0x22)data:image/jpeg;base64,$($attributes.$attr.Values.Valuestring)$([char]0x22)>"
     $val = "System.Byte[]"
 }

Then in the output of the HTML report at the end of the report generation insert the $objectphoto variable into the HTML stream.

# Output MIM Service Object Data
 $MIMServiceObjOut = $MIMServiceObjectMetaData | Sort-Object -Property Attribute | ConvertTo-Html -Fragment
 $htmlreport = ConvertTo-HTML -Body "$htmlcss<h1>Microsoft Identity Manager User Object Report</h1><h2>Query</h2>$sourcequery</br><b><center>$objectphoto</br>NOTE: Only attributes with values are displayed.</center></b><h2>Connector(s) Summary</h2>$connectorsummary<h2>MetaVerse Data</h2>$objectmetadata <h2>MIM Service CS Object Data</h2>$MIMServiceCSobjectmetadata <h2>MIM Service Object Data</h2>$MIMServiceObjOut" -Title "MIM Object Report"

As you can see above I’ve also injected the CSS ($htmlcss) into the output stream at the beginning of the Body section.  Somewhere in your script block you will need to define your CSS values. e.g.

 # StyleSheet for nice pretty output
 $htmlcss = "<style>
    h1, h2, th { text-align: center; }
    table { margin: auto; font-family: Segoe UI; box-shadow: 10px 10px 5px #888; border: thin ridge grey; }
    th { background: #0046c3; color: #fff; max-width: 400px; padding: 5px 10px; }
    td { font-size: 11px; padding: 5px 20px; color: #000; }
    tr { background: #b8d1f3; }
    tr:nth-child(even) { background: #dae5f4; }
    tr:nth-child(odd) { background: #b8d1f3; }
 </style>"

Summary

An interesting solution integrating Azure PaaS Services with Microsoft Identity Manager via PowerShell and the extremely versatile Lithnet FIM/MIM PowerShell Modules.

Please share your implementations enhancing your FIM/MIM Solution.

An Azure Timer Function App to retrieve files via FTP and Remote PowerShell

Introduction

In an age of Web Services and API’s it’s an almost a forgotten world where FTP Servers exist. However most recently I’ve had to travel back in time and interact with a FTP server to get a set of files that are produced by other systems on a daily basis. These files are needed for some flat-file imports into Microsoft Identity Manager.

Getting files off a FTP server is pretty simple. But needing to do it across a number of different environments (Development, Staging and Production) meant I was looking for an easy approach that I could also replicate quickly across multiple environments. As I already had Remote PowerShell setup on my MIM Servers for other Azure Function Apps I figured I’d use an Azure Function for obtaining the FTP Files as well.

Overview

My PowerShell Timer Function App performs the following:

  • Starts a Remote PowerShell session to my MIM Sync Server
  • Imports the PSFTP PowerShell Module
  • Creates a local directory to put the files into
  • Connects to the FTP Server
  • Gets the files and puts them into the local directory
  • Ends the session

Pre-requisites

From the overview above there are a number of pre-requites that other blog posts I’ve written detail nicely the steps involved to appropriately setup and configure. So I’m going to link to those. Namely;

  • Configure your Function App for your timezone so the schedule is correct for when you want it to run. Checkout the WEBSITE_TIME_ZONE note in this post.

    WEBSITE_TIME_ZONE

  • You’ll need to configure your Server that you are going to put the files onto for Remote PowerShell. Follow the Enable Powershell Remoting on the FIM/MIM Sync Server section of this blogpost.
  • The credentials used to connect to the MIM Server are secured as detailed in the Using an Azure Function to query FIM/MIM Service section of this blog post.
  • Create a Timer PowerShell Function App. Follow the Creating your Azure App Service section of this post but choose a Timer Trigger PowerShell App.
    • I configured my Schedule for 1030 every day using the following CRON configuration
      0 30 10 * * *
  • On the Server you’ll be connecting to in order to run the FTP processes you’ll need to copy the PSFTP Module and files to the following directories. I unzipped the PSFTP files and copied the PSFTP folder and its contents to;
    • C:\Program Files\WindowsPowerShell\Modules
    • C:\Windows\System32\WindowsPowerShell\v1.0\Modules

Configuring the Timer Trigger Function App

With all the pre-requisites in place it’s time to configure the Timer Function App that you created in the pre-requisites.

The following settings are configured in the Function App Application Settings;

  • FTPServer (the server you will be connecting to, to retrieve files)
  • FTPUsername (username to connect to the FTP Sever with)
  • FTPPassword (password for the username above)
  • FTPSourceDirectory (FTP directory to get the files from)
  • FTPTargetDirectory (the root directory under which the files will be put)

ApplicationSettings

You’ll also need Application Settings for a Username and Password associated with a user that exists on the Server that you’ll be connecting to with Remote PowerShell. In my script below these application settings are MIMSyncCredUser and MIMSyncCredPassword

Function App Script

Finally here is a raw script. You’ll need to add appropriate error handling for your environment. You’ll also want to change lines 48 and 51 for the naming of the files you are looking to acquire. And line 59 for the servername you’ll be executing the process on.

Summary

A pretty quick and simple little Azure Function App that will run each day and obtain daily/nightly extracts from an FTP Server. Cleanup of the resulting folders and files I’m doing with other on-box processes.

This post is cross-blogged on both the Kloud Blog and Darren’s Blog.