Integrating with SailPoint IdentityNow Private (v1) API’s using PowerShell

UPDATE: 5 Oct 2018
Please see this new post on accessing v1, v2 and 
non-published SailPoint IdentityNow API's using PowerShell.
The details in this post will still work for v1 API's.

How to generate the ‘Password Hash’ to leverage the IdentityNow Private API’s

Recently I’ve posted about integrating with the SailPoint IdentityNow API’s. Specifically;

So why another post on a very similar subject? Well, not all IdentityNow API’s are exposed on the v2 API Endpoints that were leveraged in the previous posts. The v1 (Private API List) is detailed on SailPoint Compass here and contains a number of functions that are extremely useful. And here is where it gets interesting. The authentication methods between v1 and v2 are not the same. There is a document that gives you most of what you need also on SailPoint Compass here that describes IdentityNow’s oAuth methods.

But here is the kicker. In order to use the older v1 API endpoints you need to generate a hash for the user associated with oAuth2.0 authentication which is in addition to the Client ID and Client Secret. The only method that I’m aware of (and believe me I lost time and effort searching) that SailPoint provide to generate the hash is to use the File Upload Utility which is available on Compass here. And that method only came to my attention after posting to the IdentityNow Community.

Now let’s say you run into the problem I did with the version of Java (yes it is a Java Utility) I had installed (v1.7);

java version "1.7.0_71"
Java(TM) SE Runtime Environment (build 1.7.0_71-b14)
Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM (build 24.71-b01, mixed mode)
Wrong Version of Java.PNG
identitynow fileuploader hash generator – idnFileUploader.jar

I didn’t have a need for Java, in fact I was surprised it was even installed on my laptop. Seems it was from an installation of Virtual Box some time ago. I didn’t want to go and get another version etc etc. But I did spin up a VM and get the Java App to run and generate the hashed password. A hashed password for IdentityNow v1 API integration looks like this;

160a028019a1ce58c679f2216a7f707fa666a674772b4742cef7b08eab99de7b

Looking at that I guessed SHA256, but there was something else going on (check the case).

The Premise and Intent

I’ve generated the password hash, why not just move on? What I was looking to achieve was the ability for a number of services to interact with IdentityNow via v1 Private API’s. As part of those processes and for management of that privileged access, it needs to be automated. Running a Java app to generate the hashed password for each identity and on each password change wasn’t an option.

The Solution

What I ended up doing, as there was no accessible documentation around how the hashed password is generated for v1 API integration still makes me feel a bit dirty and guilty that I had to do it. Maybe I shouldn’t even be documenting it? But we are licensed for this service and integration with it is still limited to what functions are available via the API and identity you are authenticating with.

I decompiled the Java App, peeked inside and looked to see how the hash was being generated. Then mimicked the process in PowerShell.

Direct Integration with IdentityNow Private (v1) API’s

Direct integration is essentially like any other API. What you need is;

  • Client ID and Client Secret (enabled via the Admin => Global => Security Settings => API Management)
  • Admin Account and Password (account name and password of an account granted Admin permissions in IdentityNow)
    • this is passed in the WebRequest Header as Digest AuthN (Base64 Encoded)
  • Token End Point to get a Token
    • “https://orgname.identitynow.com/api/oauth/token?grant_type=password&username=AdminUser&password=HashedAdminPassword”

The process is;

  1. Generate the Request to the Token Endpoint
  2. Submit the request and obtain a token
  3. Execute subsquent requests with the Bearer Token received in Step 2
  4. Renew token before it expires if continuing to make requests longer than the token life (default 60 mins)

That all looks simple right. Except for that bit about ‘hashed password’.

The Special Sauce

You’ve made it this far, so you’re probably looking to do this. Here it is. The inputs are the IdentityNow Login Name for an Admin account and the plaintext password for that account.

In order to simplify generating the hash you will need to install the PowerShell Community Extensions (PSCX) Module which is in the PowerShell Gallery here. This provides the super handy Get-Hash cmdlet that I use extensively in a number of my scripts. Here I’m using it to generate the SHA256 hashes.

You should be on PowerShell 5.1 or later so the following will install it for you (from an elevated PowerShell console);

install-module -name pscx

Generate passwordhash Script

Update lines 2 and 3 for the Admin Identity you are generating the hash for. Line 8 and 9 are the lines that generate the hash and prepare it for use in requesting a token.

Calling IdentityNow Private API’s with PowerShell

Here is an example of using PowerShell to generate the hashed Password, obtain a token then call the API to return the list of Profiles in IdentityNow.

  • Update the obvious lines for your instance (Lines 2, 4, 8, 10, 11)
  • Update Line 25 if you want to call a different v1 API

Summary

Hopefully I’ve saved others the couple of hours of messing around to workout how to programatically generate the needed password hash to allow automated integration with the SailPoint IdentityNow v1 Private API’s.

Lifecycle Management of Identities in SailPoint IdentityNow via API and PowerShell

Introduction

If you’ve been following along I’ve been posting about leveraging the SailPoint IdentityNow API for;

Now that I’ve covered Searching and Authoring all that is left is lifecycle management. And that’s what I’ll cover in this post. Updating and Deleting Entities via the API.

Updating SailPoint IdentityNow Entities

If you have not read the first post in this series, start there as ‘updating’ builds on top of Search/Reporting. It also covers enabling the API.

My quick start guide to updating IdentityNow Entities starts with searching to find the Entities (probably Users) you want to update. In my example below I’m searching for all objects on a Source. Then I iterate through the results and update them. I’m updating the Country attribute.

When updating an entity (e.g User) you need to perform a PATCH webrequest specifying the underlying ID (objectID) of the object. The URI format looks like;

https://orgName.api.identitynow.com/v2/accounts/2c91808365bd1f010165caf761625bcd?org=orgName

Example Script

Here is an example script. As per the previous two posts, change all the lines for your tenant and your API details.

  • Line 16 is the query for objects to update
  • Lines 39-41 is the attribute to update

Updating Manager

For manager, the attribute is a reference on the IdentityNow Source to the Manager. On my “External Entities” Source I locate the object representing the Manager and obtain their accountId (which in my case is firstname.lastname) and set that as the ManagerID. I then find the users that I want to update for this manager and update them as we did in the previous example, but with a reference to accountId of the Manager for the Manager attribute.

NOTE: When querying IdentityNow via the API the syntax is very important. Especially when also incorporating variables. If I have a variable $manager with a displayName value, that would normally contain a space. So we need to capture the whole string. Here is an example of doing that. So in order to query for $manager = “Rick Sanchez” in PowerShell that would be:

$queryManager = "attributes.displayName:"+'"'+"$($manager)"+'"'

which will give us attributes.displayName:”Rick Sanchez” which will return in my case the single object for Rich Sanchez not a list of references to Rick Sanchez.

Deleting SailPoint IdentityNow Entities

Deleting is very similar to Updating. Again the easiest method is to search and obtain the object(s) to be deleted and then delete via a DELETE webrequest specifying the underlying ID (objectID) of the object to be deleted. The URI looks like;

https://orgName.api.identitynow.com/v2/accounts/2c91808565bd1f110165cb628d1a702f?org=orgName

Example Script

Here is an example script. It searches IdentityNow based on object naming (see line 14), then finds the Source that the object is connected to that we wish to delete. In this example the Source is the one I created in the last post “External Entities”. Update for the name of your Source (line 25).

Summary

Using the API we can Search for Identities, Author and Update them.

Authoring Identities in SailPoint IdentityNow via the API and PowerShell

Introduction

A key aspect of any Identity Management project is having an Authoritative Source for Identity. Typically this is a Human Resources system. But what about identity types that aren’t in the authoritative source? External Vendors, contingent contractors and identities that are used by End User Computing systems such as Privileged Accounts, Service Accounts, Training Accounts.

Now some Identity Management Solutions allow you to Author identity through their Portals, and provide a nice GUI to create a user/training/service account. SailPoint IdentityNow however doesn’t have that functionality. However it does have an API and I’ll show you in the post how you can use it to Author identity into IdentityNow via the API.

Overview

So, now you’re thinking great, I can author Identity into IdentityNow via the API. But, am I supposed to get managers to interface with an API to kick off a workflow to create identities? Um, no. I don’t think we want to be giving them API access into our Identity Management solution.

The concept is this. An Identity Request WebApp would collect the necessary information for the identities to be authored and facilitate the creation of them in IdentityNow via the API. SailPoint kindly provide a sample project that does just that. It is available on Github here. Through looking at this project and the IdentityNow API I worked out how to author identity via the API using PowerShell. There were a few gotchas I had to work through so I’m providing a working example for you to base a solution around.

Getting Started

There are a couple of things to note.

  • Obviously you’ll need API access
  • You’ll want to create a Source that is of the Flat File type (Generic or Delimited File)
    • We can’t create accounts against Directly Connected Sources
  • There are a few attributes that are mandatory for the creation
    • At a minimum I supply id, name, givenName, familyName, displayName and e-mail
    • At an absolute bare minimum you need the following. Otherwise you will end up with an account in IdentityNow that will show as “Identity Exception”
      • id, name, givenName, familyName, e-mail*

* see note below on e-mail/email attribute format based on Source type

Creating a Flat File Source to be used for Identity Authoring

In the IdentityNow Portal under Admin => Connections => Sources select New.

Create New Source.PNG

I’m using Generic as the Source Type. Give it a name and description. Select Continue

New Generic Source.PNG

Assign an Owner for the Source and check the Accounts checkbox. Select Save.

New Source Properties.PNG

At the end of the URL of the now Saved new Source get and record the SourceID. This will be required so that when we create users via the API, they will be created against this Source.

SourceID.PNG

If we look at the Accounts on this Source we see there are obviously none.

Accounts.PNG

We’d better create some. But first you need to complete the configuration for this Source. Go and create an Identity Profile for this Source, and configure your Identity Mappings as per your requirements. This is the same as you would for any other IdentityNow Source.

Authoring Identities in IdentityNow with PowerShell

The following script is the bare minimum to use PowerShell to create an account in IdentityNow. Change;

  • line 2 for your Client ID
  • line 4 for your Client Secret
  • line 8 for your Tenant Org Name
  • line 12 for your Source ID
  • the body of the request for the account to be created (lines 16-21)

NOTE: By default on the Generic Source the email attribute is ’email’. By default on the Delimited Source the email attribute is ‘e-mail’. If your identities after executing the script and a correlation are showing as ‘Identity Exception’ then it’s probably because of this field being incorrect for the Source type. If in doubt check the Account Schema on the Source.

Execute the script and refresh the Accounts page. You’ll see we now have an account for Rick.

Rick Sanchez.PNG

Expanding Rick’s account we can see the full details.

Rick Full Details.PNG

Testing it out for a Bulk Creation

A few weeks ago I wrote this post about generating user data from public datasets. I’m going to take that and generate 50 accounts. I’ve added additional attributes to the Account Schema (for suburb, state, postcode, street). Here is a script combining the two.

Running the script creates our 50 users in conjunction to the couple I already had present.

Bulk Accounts Created.PNG

Summary

Using the IdentityNow API we can quickly leverage it to author identity into SailPoint IdentityNow. That’s the easy bit sorted. Now to come up with a pretty UI and a UX that passes the End-User usability tests. I’ll leave that with you.

Reporting on SailPoint IdentityNow Identities using the ‘Search’ (Beta) API and PowerShell

Introduction

SailPoint recently made available in BETA their new Search functionality. There’s some great documentation around using the Search functions through the IdentityNow Portal on Compass^. Specifically;

^ Compass Access Required

Each of those articles are great, but they are centered around performing the search via the Portal.  For some of my needs, I need to do it via the API and that’s what I’ll cover in this post.

*NOTE: Search is currently in BETA. There is a chance some functionality may change. SailPoint advise to not use this functionality in Production whilst it is in Beta.  

Enabling API Access

Under Admin => Global => Security Settings => API Management select New and give the API Account a Description.

New API Client.PNG

Client ID and Client Secret

ClientID & Secret.PNG

In the script to access the API we will take the Client ID and Client Secret and encode them for Basic Authentication to the IdentityNow Search API. To do that in PowerShell use the following example replacing ClientID and ClientSecret with yours.

$clientID = 'abcd1234567'
$clientSecret = 'abcd12345sdkslslfjahd'
$Bytes = [System.Text.Encoding]::utf8.GetBytes("$($clientID):$($clientSecret)")
$encodedAuth =[Convert]::ToBase64String($Bytes)

Searching

With API access now enabled we can start building some queries. There are two methods I’ve found. Using query strings on the URL and using JSON payloads as an HTTP Post. I’ll give examples of both.

PowerShell Setup

Here is the base of all my scripts for using PowerShell to access the IdentityNow Search.

Change;

  • line 3 for your Client ID
  • line 5 for your Client Secret
  • line 10 for your IdentityNow Tenant Organisation name (by default the host portion of the URL e.g https://orgname.identitynow.com )

Searching via URL Query String

First we will start with searching by having the query string in the URL.

Single attribute search via URL

$query = 'firstname EQ Darren'
$Accounts = Invoke-RestMethod -Method Get -Uri "$($URI)limit=$($searchLimit)&query=$($query)" -Headers @{Authorization = "Basic $($encodedAuth)" }

Single Attribute URL Search.PNG

Multiple attribute search via URL

Multiple criteria queries need to be constructed carefully. The query below just looks wrong, yet if you place the quotes where you think they should go, you don’t get the expected results. The following works.

$query = 'attributes.firstname"="Darren" AND attributes.lastname"="Robinson"'

and it works whether you Encode the URL or not

$queryEncoded = [System.Web.HttpUtility]::UrlEncode($query)
$Accounts = Invoke-RestMethod -Method Get -Uri "$($URI)limit=$($searchLimit)&query=$($queryEncoded)" -Headers @{Authorization = "Basic $($encodedAuth)" 

Multiple Attribute Query Search.PNG

Here is another searching based on identities having a connection to a source containing the word ‘Directory’ AND having less the 5 accounts

$URI = "https://$($org).api.identitynow.com/v2/search/identities?"
$query = '@access(source.name:*Directory*) AND entitlementCount:<5'
$Accounts = Invoke-RestMethod -Method Get -Uri "$($URI)limit=$($searchLimit)&query=$($query)" -Headers @{Authorization = "Basic $($encodedAuth)" }

Multiple Attribute Query Search2.PNG

Searching via HTTP Post and JSON Body

Now we will perform similar searches, but with the search strings in the body of the HTTP Request.

Single attribute search via POST and JSON Based Body Query

$body = @{"match"=@{"attributes.firstname"="Darren"}}
$body = $body | convertto-json 
$Accounts = Invoke-RestMethod -Method POST -Uri "$($URI)limit=$($searchLimit)" -Headers @{Authorization = "Basic $($encodedAuth)" } -ContentType 'application/json' -Body $body
Single Attribute JSON Search.PNG

Multiple attribute search via POST and JSON Based Body Query

If you want to have multiple criteria and submit it via a POST request, this is how I got it working. For each part I construct it and convert it to JSON and build up the body with each search element.

$body1 = @{"match"=@{"attributes.firstname"="Darren"}}
$body2 = @{"match"=@{"attributes.lastname"="Robinson"}}
$body = $body1 | ConvertTo-Json
$body += $body2 | ConvertTo-Json
$Accounts = Invoke-RestMethod -Method POST -Uri "$($URI)limit=$($searchLimit)" -Headers @{Authorization = "Basic $($encodedAuth)" } -ContentType 'application/json' -Body $body
Multiple Attribute JSON Search.PNG

Getting Full Identity Objects based off Search

Lastly now that we’ve been able to build queries via two different methods and we have the results we’re looking for, lets output some relevant information about them. We will iterate through each of the returned results and output some specifics about their sources and entitlements. Same as above, update for your ClientID, ClientSecret, Orgname and search criteria.

Extended Information.PNG

Summary

Once you’ve enabled API access and understood the query format it is super easy to get access to the identity data in your IdentityNow tenant.

My recommendation is to use the IdentityNow Search function in the Portal to refine your searches for what you are looking to return programmatically and then use the API to get the data for whatever purpose it is.

Deploying a SailPoint IdentityNow Virtual Appliance in Azure

UPDATE: 10 October 2018
SailPoint now support and provide guidance on deploying 
IdentityNow Virtual Appliances in Azure. 
See this document on Compass for more details

Introduction

The CentOS image that SailPoint provide for the IdentityNow Virtual Appliance that performs integration between ‘Sources’ and IdentityNow is VMWare based. I don’t have any VMWare Infrastructure to run it on and really didn’t want to run up any VMWare environments for this component. All my other infrastructure is in Azure. I’d love to run my VA(s) in Azure too.

In discussions with SailPoint I understand it is simply a case that they haven’t certified their CentOS image on Azure. So I figured I’d convert the VM, get it into Azure and see if it works from my Sandpit environment. This blog post details how I got it working.

Disclaimer: If you use this for more than a Sandpit/Test environment let your SailPoint CSM know. This isn’t an approved process or a support configuration. That said it works for me.

Overview

This is the high-level process I threw together that worked for me.

  1. Obtain the CentOS Image from the IdentityNow Virtual Appliance Setup
  2. Convert the VMWare VMDK image to Hyper-V VHD format using VirtualBox vboxmanage (free)
  3. From the Azure MarketPlace create a Seed VM based on CentOS (with new Resource Group, Storage Account, Virtual Network etc)
  4. Upload the VHD to the Azure Storage Account (associated with VM from Step 3) using Azure Storage Explorer
  5. Create a new VM based off the VM from Step 3 to use the disk from Step 4 as the Operating System disk
  6. Log in and configure the Virtual Appliance

Convert VMWare VM to Hyper-V.png

Prerequisites

  1. Virtual Box (for the disk image converter). You could probably do it with other tools but I’ve used this before and it just works.
  2. Enough hard disk space for the VA image and the converted image. The base image is ~2.8Gb and when converted to a fixed disk image it becomes ~128Gb (which can compress to ~3Gb for initial upload).
  3. Azure Storage Explorer. We’ll need this to upload the converted virtual disk to Azure.

SailPoint Virtual Appliance CentOS VMWare Image

To download the CentOS VMWare Image login to the Admin section of your IdentityNow Tenant.  Under Admin => Connections => Virtual Appliances create a New Cluster. Select that Cluster then Virtual Appliances => New 

Download the Appliance Package 

Create New VA.PNG

Converting the CentOS VMWare Virtual Disk to a Fixed Hyper-V Virtual Disk

I already had Virtual Box installed on my computer. I had to give the full path to VBoxManage (as shown below) and called it with the switches to convert the image;

vboxmanage clonehd –format VHD –variant Fixed

The –variant Fixed switch takes the dynamic image and converts it to Fixed as this is a requirement in Azure.

ConvertVADisk 1.PNG

The image conversion started and completed in under ten minutes.

Converted Fixed.PNG

Creating an Azure CentOS VM

In the Azure Portal I created a New Resource and chose CoreOS.

NewCoreOS 1

I gave it a name, chose HDD as the disk type and gave it a Username and Password.

NewCoreOS 2

I chose sizing in line with the recommendations for a Virtual Appliance.

NewCoreOS 3

And kept everything else simple (for my sandpit environment).

NewCoreOS 4

After the VM had deployed I had a Resource Group with the necessary Virtual Network, Storage Account etc.

Resource Group.PNG

Upload the Converted Disk to Azure Storage

I created a vhd container (in the Storage Group associated with the VM I just created) to hold the new VHD. Using Azure Storage Explorer I then uploaded the converted image. Select Page Blob for the blob type.

Upload VHD

You’ll want to have a decent internet connection to do this. I converted the SailPoint image on an Azure VM (to which I added a 256Gb data disk too). I then uploaded the new 128Gb VHD disk image from within Azure to the target Resource Group in about 75 minutes.

Upload VHD 2

Below I show the SailPoint Virtual Appliance CentOS OS converted disk image uploaded to Azure Storage Account Blob Storage.

Upload VHD 3.PNG

Generate SAS Token / Get Blob URI

We won’t used a SAS Token, but this just gives easy access to the Storage Blob URL. Right click on the VHD Blob and select Generate Shared Access Signature. Select Create.

Right Click - Get Shared Access Signature

Copy the URL. We’ll need parts of this for the script to create a new CentOS VM with our VA Disk Image.

Get VHD and BLOB Details

Create the new VM for our Virtual Appliance

Update the script below for:

  • The Resource Group you created the Seed VM in (line 2)
  • The Seed VM Name (line 4)
  • The Seed VM Subnet Name (line 6)

Each of those are easily obtained from the Seed VM Summary as highlighted below.

  •  update the Disk Blob details in Live 8 and 10 as copied earlier

After stepping through the script to create the new VM, and happy with the new name etc, I executed the New-AzureRMVM command.

Create New VM

And the VM was created in a couple of minutes.

Create VM Initiated

Accessing the new VM

Getting the IP address from the new VM Summary I SSH’d into it.

VM Started

And logged in with the default credentials from SailPoint. (Windows Subsystem for Linux is awesome).

SSH In to VA

Next Steps

  1. Change the password on your Virtual Appliance (passwrd)
  2. Create a DNS Name, update the configuration as per SailPoint VA Configuration tasks
  3. Create the VA and Test the Connection from the IdentityNow Portal
  4. Delete your original SeedVM as it is no longer required
  5. Add an NSG to the new VM
  6. Create another VM in a different location for High Availability and configure it in IdentityNow

Below shows my Azure based Virtual Appliance connected and all setup.

Cluster Up and Running.PNG

Summary

Whilst not officially supported it is possible to convert the SailPoint Virtual Appliance VMWare based image to an Azure compatible Hyper-V image and assign it as the Operating System disk on an Azure Linux (CoreOS) Virtual Machine. If you need to do something similar I hope my approach gives you some ideas.

If you then need to create another Virtual Appliance in Azure you have a Data Disk you can assign to a VM and upload to wherever it needs to be for creation of another Virtual Appliance VM.