How to access Microsoft Identity Manager Hybrid Report data using PowerShell, Graph API and oAuth2

Hybrid Reporting is a great little feature of Microsoft Identity Manager. A small agent installed on the MIM Sync Server will send reporting data to Azure for MIM SSPR and MIM Group activities. See how to install and configure it here.

But what if you want to get the reporting data without going to the Azure Portal and looking at the Audit Reports ? Enter the Azure AD Reports and Events REST API that is currently in preview.  It took me a couple of cracks and getting this working, because documentation is a little vague especially when accessing it via PowerShell and oAuth2. So I’ve written it up and hope it helps for anyone else looking to go down this route.

Gotchas

Accessing the Reports via the API has a couple of caveats that I had to work through:

  • Having the correct permissions to access the report data. Pretty much everything you read tells you that you need to be a Global Admin. Once I had my oAuth tokens I messed around a little and a was able to also get the following from back from the API when purposely using an identity that didn’t have the right permissions. The key piece is “Api request is not from global admin or security admin or security reader role”. I authorized the WebApp using an account that is in the Security Reader Role, and can successfully access the report data.

  • Reading the documentation here on MSDN I incorrectly assumed each category was the report name. Only when I called the “https://graph.windows.net//$metadata?api-version=beta”  and looked at the list of reports I noticed each report was plural.The three that I wanted to access (and report on) are obviously the MIM Hybrid Reports;
"Name":  "mimSsgmGroupActivityEvents",
"Name":  "mimSsprActivityEvents",
"Name":  "mimSsprRegistrationActivityEvents",

Here is the full list of Reports available as of 24 May 2017.

{
    "Name":  "b2cAuthenticationCountSummary",
    "LicenseRequired":  "False"
}
{
    "Name":  "b2cMfaRequestCount",
    "LicenseRequired":  "False"
}
{
    "Name":  "b2cMfaRequestEvent",
    "LicenseRequired":  "False"
}
{
    "Name":  "b2cAuthenticationEvent",
    "LicenseRequired":  "False"
}
{
    "Name":  "b2cAuthenticationCount",
    "LicenseRequired":  "False"
}
{
    "Name":  "b2cMfaRequestCountSummary",
    "LicenseRequired":  "False"
}
{
    "Name":  "tenantUserCount",
    "LicenseRequired":  "False"
}
{
    "Name":  "applicationUsageDetailEvents",
    "LicenseRequired":  "False"
}
{
    "Name":  "applicationUsageSummaryEvents",
    "LicenseRequired":  "True"
}
{
    "Name":  "b2cUserJourneySummaryEvents",
    "LicenseRequired":  "False"
}
{
    "Name":  "b2cUserJourneyEvents",
    "LicenseRequired":  "False"
}
{
    "Name":  "cloudAppDiscoveryEvents",
    "LicenseRequired":  "False"
}
{
    "Name":  "mimSsgmGroupActivityEvents",
    "LicenseRequired":  "True"
}
{
    "Name":  "ssgmGroupActivityEvents",
    "LicenseRequired":  "True"
}
{
    "Name":  "mimSsprActivityEvents",
    "LicenseRequired":  "True"
}
{
    "Name":  "ssprActivityEvents",
    "LicenseRequired":  "True"
}
{
    "Name":  "mimSsprRegistrationActivityEvents",
    "LicenseRequired":  "True"
}
{
    "Name":  "ssprRegistrationActivityEvents",
    "LicenseRequired":  "True"
}
{
    "Name":  "threatenedCredentials",
    "LicenseRequired":  "False"
}
{
    "Name":  "compromisedCredentials",
    "LicenseRequired":  "False"
}
{
    "Name":  "auditEvents",
    "LicenseRequired":  "False"
}
{
    "Name":  "accountProvisioningEvents",
    "LicenseRequired":  "False"
}
{
    "Name":  "signInsFromUnknownSourcesEvents",
    "LicenseRequired":  "False"
}
{
    "Name":  "signInsFromIPAddressesWithSuspiciousActivityEvents",
    "LicenseRequired":  "True"
}
{
    "Name":  "signInsFromMultipleGeographiesEvents",
    "LicenseRequired":  "False"
}
{
    "Name":  "signInsFromPossiblyInfectedDevicesEvents",
    "LicenseRequired":  "True"
}
{
    "Name":  "irregularSignInActivityEvents",
    "LicenseRequired":  "True"
}
{
    "Name":  "allUsersWithAnomalousSignInActivityEvents",
    "LicenseRequired":  "True"
}
{
    "Name":  "signInsAfterMultipleFailuresEvents",
    "LicenseRequired":  "False"
}
{
    "Name":  "applicationUsageSummary",
    "LicenseRequired":  "True"
}
{
    "Name":  "userActivitySummary",
    "LicenseRequired":  "False"
}
{
    "Name":  "groupActivitySummary",
    "LicenseRequired":  "True"
}

How to Access the Reporting API using PowerShell

What you need to do is;

  • Register a WebApp
    • Assign a reply to URL of https://localhost
    • Assign it Read.Directory permissions
  • Get an oAuth2 Authentication Code using an account that is either Global Admin or in the Security Admin or Security Reader Azure Roles
  • Use your Bearer and Refresh tokens to query for the reports you’re interested in

Register your WebApp

In the Azure Portal create a new Web app/API app and assign it https://localhost as the Reply URL. Record the Application ID for use in the PowerShell script.

Assign the Read Directory data permission as shown below

Obtain a key from the Keys option on your new Web App.  Record it for use in the PowerShell script.

Generate an Authentication Code, get a Bearer and Refresh Token

Update the following script, changing Lines 5 & 6 for the ApplicationID/ClientId and Client Secret for the WebApp you created above.

Run the script and you will be prompted to authenticate. Use an account in the tenant where you created the Web App that is a Global Admin or in the Security Admin or Security Reader Azure Roles. You will need to change the location where you want the refresh.token stored (line 18).

If you’ve done everything correctly you have authenticated, got an AuthCode which was then used to get your Authorization Tokens. The value of the $Authorization variable should look similar to this;

Now you can use the Refresh token to generate new Authorization Tokens when they time out, simply by calling the Get-NewTokens function included in the script above.

Querying the Reporting API

Now that you have the necessary prerequisites sorted you can query the Reporting API.

Here are a couple of simple queries to return some data to get you started. Update the script for the tenant name of your AzureAD. With the $Authorization values from the script above you can get data for the MIM Hybrid Reports.

Synchronizing Exchange Online/Office 365 User Profile Photos with FIM/MIM

Introduction

This is Part Two in the two-part blog post on managing users profile photos with Microsoft FIM/MIM. Part one here detailed managing users Azure AD/Active Directory profile photo. This post delves deeper into photos, specifically around Office 365 and the reason why you may want to manage these via FIM/MIM.

Background

User profile photos should be simple to manage. But in a rapidly moving hybrid cloud world it can be a lot more complex than it needs to be. The best summary I’ve found of this evolving moving target is from Paul Ryan here.

Using Paul’s sound advice we too are advising our customers to let users manage their profile photo (within corporate guidelines) via Exchange Online. However as described in this article photos managed in OnPremise Active Directory are synchronized to Azure AD and on to other Office365 services only once. And of course we want them to be consistent across AD DS, Azure AD, Exchange Online and all other Office365 Services.

This post details synchronizing user profile photos from Exchange Online to MIM for further synchronization to other systems. The approach uses a combination of Azure GraphAPI and Exchange Remote PowerShell to manage Exchange Online User Profile Photos.

The following graphic depicts the what the end goal is;

Current State

  • Users historically had a photo in Active Directory. DirSync/ADSync/AzureADConnect then synchronized that to Azure AD (and once only into Office 365).
  • Users update their photo in Office365 (via Exchange Online and Outlook Web Access)
    • the photo is synchronized across Office365 Services

Desired State

  • An extension of the Current State is the requirement to be able to take the image uploaded by users in Exchange Online, and synchronize it back to the OnPremise AD, and any other relevant services that leverage a profile photo
  • Have AzureADConnect keep AzureAD consistent with the new photo obtained from Office365 that is synchronized to the OnPrem Active Directory
  • Sync the current photo to the MIM Portal

Synchronizing Office365 Profile Photos

Whilst Part-one dealt with the AzureAD side of profile photos as an extension to an existing AzureAD PowerShell Management Agent for FIM/MIM, I’ve separated out the Office365 side to streamline it and make it as efficient as possible. More on that later. As such I’ve created a new PowerShell Management Agent specifically for Office365 User Profile Photos.

I’m storing the Exchange Online photo in the MIM Metaverse as a binary object just as I did for the AzureAD photo (but in a different attribute ). I’m also storing a checksum of the photos (as I did for the AzureAD Photo, but also in a different attribute) to make it easier for comparing what is in Azure AD and Exchange Online, to then be used to determine if changes have been made (eg. user updated their profile photo).

Photo Checksum

For generating the hash of the profile photos I’m using Get-Hash from the Powershell Community Extensions.  Whilst PowerShell has Get-FileHash I don’t want to write the profile photos out to disk and read them back in just to get the checksum. That slows the process up by 25%. You can get the checksum using a number of different methods and algorithms. Just be consistent and use the same method across both profile photos and you’ll be comparing apples with apples and the comparison logic will work.

Some notes on Photos and Exchange Online (and MFA)

This is where things went off on a number of tangents. Initially I tried accessing the photos using Exchange Online Remote PowerShell.

CAVEAT 1: If your Office365 Tenant is enabled for Multi-Factor Authentication (which it should be) you will need to get the Exchange Online Remote PowerShell Module as detailed here. Chances are you won’t have full Office365 Admin access though, so as long as the account you will be using is in the Recipient Management Role you should be able to go to the Exchange Control Panel using a URL like https://outlook.office365.com/ecp/?realm=<tenantname>&wa=wsignin1.0 where tenantname is something like customer.com.au From the Hybrid menu on in the right handside pane you will then be able to download the Microsoft.Online.CSE.PSModule.Client.application I had to use Internet Explorer to download the file and get it installed successfully. Once installed I used a few lines from this script here to load the Function and start my RPS session from within PowerShell ISE during solution development.

CAVEAT 2: The EXO RPS MFA PS Function doesn’t allow you to pass it your account password. You can pass it the identity you want to use, but not the password. That makes scheduled process automation with it impossible.

CAVEAT 3: The RPS session exposes the Get-UserPhoto cmdlet which is great. But the RPS session leverages the GraphAPI. The RPS PS Module doesn’t refresh it’s tokens, so if the import takes longer than 60 minutes then using this method you’re a bit stuffed.

CAVEAT 4: Using the Get-UserPhoto cmdlet detailed above, the syncing of photos is slow. As in I was only getting ~4 profile photos per minute slow. This also goes back to the token refresh issue as for pretty much any environment of the size I deal with, this is too slow and will timeout.

CAVEAT 5: You can whitelist the IP Address (or subnet) of your host so MFA is not required using Contextual IP Addressing Whitelisting. At that point there isn’t really a need to use the MFA Enabled PREVIEW EXO RPS function anyway. That said I still needed to whitelist my MIM Sync Server(s) from MFA to allow integration into the Graph API. I configured just the single host. The whitelist takes CIDR format so that looks like /32 (eg. 11.2.33.4/32)

Performance Considerations

As I mentioned above,

  • using the Get-UserPhoto cmdlet was slow. ~4 per minute slow
  • using the GraphAPI into Exchange Online and looking at each user and determining if they had a photo then downloading it, was also slow. Slow because at this customer only ~50% of their users have a photo on their mailbox. As such I was only able to retrieve ~145 photos in 25 minutes. *Note: all timings listed above were during development and actually outputting the images to disk to verify functionality. 

Implemented Solution

After all my trial and error on this, here is my final approach and working solution;

  1. Use the Exchange Online Remote PowerShell (non-MFA version) to query and return a collection of all mailboxes with an image *Note, add an exception for your MIM Sync host to the white-listed hosts for MFA (if your Office365 Tenant is enabled for MFA) so the process can be automated
  2. Use the Graph API to obtain those photos
    • with this I was able to retrieve ~1100 profile photos in ~17* minutes (after ~2 minutes to query and get the list of mailboxes with a profile photo)

Pre-requisites

There’s a lot of info above, so let me summarize the pre-requisties;

  • The Granfeldt PowerShell MA
  • Whitelist your FIM/MIM Sync Server from MFA (if your Office 365 environment is enabled for MFA)
  • Add the account you will run the MA as, that will in turn connect to EXO via RPS to the Recipient Management Role
  • Create a WebApp for the PS MA to use to access users Profile Photos via the Graph API (fastest method)
  • Powershell Community Extensions to generate the image checksum

Creating the WebApp to access Office365 User Profile Photos

Go to your Azure Portal and select the Azure Active Directory Blade from the Resource Menu bar on the left. Then select App Registrations and from the Manage Section of the Azure Active Directory menu, and finally from the top of the main pane select “New Application Registration“.

Give it a name and select Web app/API as the type of app. Make the sign-in URL https://localhost and then select Create.

Record the ApplicationID that you see in the Registered App Essentials window. You’ll need this soon.

Now select All Settings => Required Permissions. Select Read all users basic profiles in addition to Sign in and read user profile. Select Save.

Under Required Permissions select Add and then select 1 Select an API, and select Office 365 Exchange Online then click Select.

Choose 2 Select Permissions and then select Read user profiles and Read all users’ basic profiles. Click Select.

Select Grant Permissions

From Settings select Keys, give your key a Description, choose a key lifetime and select Save. RECORD the key value. You’ll need this along with the WebApp ApplicationID/ClientID for the Import.ps1 script.

Using the information from your newly registered WebApp, we need to perform the first authentication (and authorization of the WebApp) to the Graph API. Taking your ApplicationID, Key (Client Secret) and the account you will use on on the Management Agent (and that you have assigned the Recipient Management Role in Exchange Online) and run the script detailed in this post here. It will authenticate you to your new WebApp via the GraphAPI after asking you to provide the account you will use on the MA and Authorizing the permissions you selected when registering the app. It will also create a refresh.token file which we will give to the MA to automate our connection. The Authorization dialog looks like this.

Creating the Management Agent

Now we can create our Management Agent using the Granfeldt PowerShell Management Agent. If you haven’t created one before checkout a post like this one, that further down the post shows the creation of a Granfeldt PSMA. Don’t forget to provide blank export.ps1 and password.ps1 files on the directory where you place the PSMA scripts.

PowerShell Management Agent Schema.ps1

PowerShell Management Agent Import.ps1

As detailed above the PSMA will leverage the WebApp to read users Exchange Profile Photos via the Graph API. The Import script also leverages Remote Powershell into Exchange Online (for reasons also detailed above). The account you run the Management Agent as will need to be added to the Recipient Management Role Group in order to use Remote PowerShell into Exchange Online and get the information required.

Take the Import.ps1 script below and update;

  • Update lines 11, 24 and 42 for the path to where you have put your PSMA. Mine is under the Extensions directory in a directory named EXOPhotos.
  • copy the refresh.token generated when authenticating and authorizing the WebApp earlier into the directory you specified in line 42 above.
  • Create a Debug directory under the directory you specified in lines 11,24 and 42 above so you can see what the MA is doing as you implement and debug it the first few times.
  • I’ve written the Import to use Paged Imports, so make sure you tick the Paged Imports checkbox on the configuration of the MA
  •  Update Lines 79 and 80 with your ApplicationID and Client Secret that you recorded when creating your WebApp

 

Running the Exchange User Profile Photos MA

Now that you have created the MA, you should have select the EXOUser ObjectClass and the attributes defined in the schema. You should also create the EXOPhoto (as Binary) and EXOPhotoChecksum (as String) attributes in the Metaverse on the person ObjectType (assuming you are using the built-in person ObjectType).

Configure your flow rules to flow the EXOPhoto and EXOPhotoChecksum on the MA to their respective attributes in the MV.

Create a Stage Only run profile and run it. If you have done everything correctly you will see photos come into the Connector Space.

Looking at the Connector Space, I can see EXOPhoto and EXOPhotoChecksum have been imported.

After performing a Synchronization to get the data from the Connector Space into the Metaverse it is time to test the image that lands in the Metaverse. That is quick and easy via PowerShell and the Lithnet MIIS Automation PowerShell Module.

$me = Get-MVObject -ObjectType person -Attribute accountName -Value "drobinson"
$me.Attributes.EXOPhoto.Values.ValueBinary
[System.Io.File]::WriteAllBytes("c:\temp\myOutlookphoto.jpg" ,$me.Attributes.EXOPhoto.Values.ValueBinary )

The file is output to the directory with the filename specified.

Opening the file reveals correctly my Profile Photo.

Summary

In Part one we got the AzureAD/Active Directory photo. In this post we got the Office365 photo.

Now that we have the images from Office365 we need to synchronize any update to photos to Active Directory (and in-turn via AADConnect to Azure AD). Keep in mind the image size limits for Active Directory and that we retrieved the largest photo available from Office365 when synchronizing the photo on. There are a number of PowerShell modules for photo manipulation that will allow you to resize accordingly.

 

 

 

How to use a Powershell Azure Function to Tweet IoT environment data

Overview

This blog post details how to use a Powershell Azure Function App to get information from a RestAPI and send a social media update.

The data can come from anywhere, and in the case of this example I’m getting the data from WioLink IoT Sensors. This builds upon my previous post here that details using Powershell to get environmental information and put it in Power BI.  Essentially the difference in this post is outputting the manipulated data to social media (Twitter) whilst still using a TimerTrigger Powershell Azure Function App to perform the work and leverage the “serverless” Azure Functions model.

Prerequisites

The following are prerequisites for this solution;

Create a folder on your local machine for the Powershell Module then save the module to your local machine using the powershell command ‘Save-Module” as per below.

Save-Module -Name InvokeTwitterAPIs -Path c:\temp\twitter

Create a Function App Plan

If you don’t already have a Function App Plan create one by searching for Function App in the Azure Management Portal. Give it a Name, Select Consumption so you only pay for what you use, and select an appropriate location and Storage Account.

Create a Twitter App

Head over to http://dev.twitter.com and create a new Twitter App so you can interact with Twitter using their API. Give you Twitter App a name. Don’t worry about the URL too much or the need for the Callback URL. Select Create your Twitter Application.

Select the Keys and Access Tokens tab and take a note of the API Key and the API Secret. Select the Create my access token button.

Take a note of your Access Token and Access Token Secret. We’ll need these to interact with the Twitter API.

Create a Timer Trigger Azure Function App

Create a new TimerTrigger Azure Powershell Function. For my app I’m changing from the default of a 5 min schedule to hourly on the top of the hour. I did this after I’d already created the Function App as shown below. To update the schedule I edited the Function.json file and changed the schedule to “schedule”: “0 0 * * * *”

Give your Function App a name and select Create.

Configure Azure Function App Application Settings

In your Azure Function App select “Configure app settings”. Create new App Settings for your Twitter Account, Twitter Account AccessToken, AccessTokenSecret, APIKey and APISecret using the values from when you created your Twitter App earlier.

Deployment Credentials

If you haven’t already configured Deployment Credentials for your Azure Function Plan do that and take note of them so you can upload the Twitter Powershell module to your app in the next step.

Take note of your Deployment Username and FTP Hostname.

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/76015/BlogImages/FunctionIOTWeather/AppDevSettings.png

Upload the Twitter Powershell Module to the Azure Function App

Create a sub-directory under your Function App named bin and upload the Twitter Powershell Module using a FTP Client. I’m using WinSCP.

From the Applications Settings option start Kudu.

Traverse the folder structure to get the path do the Twitter Powershell Module and note it.

Update the code to replace the sample from the creation of the Trigger Azure Function as shown below to import the Twitter Powershell Module. Include the get-help lines for the module so we can see in the logs that the modules were imported and we can see the cmdlets they contain.

Validating our Function App Environment

Update the code to replace the sample from the creation of the Trigger Azure Function as shown below to import the Twitter Powershell Module. Include the get-help line for the module so we can see in the logs that the module was imported and we can see the cmdlets they contain. Select Save and Run.

Below is my output. I can see the output from the Twitter Module.

Function Application Script

Below is my sample script. It has no error handling etc so isn’t production ready, but gives a working example of getting data in from an API (in this case IoT sensors) and sends a tweet out to Twitter.

Viewing the Tweet

And here is the successful tweet.

Summary

This shows how easy it is to utilise Powershell and Azure Function Apps to get data and transform it for use in other ways. In this example a social media platform. The input could easily be business data from an API and the output a corporate social platform such as Yammer.

Follow Darren on Twitter @darrenjrobinson

How to use a Powershell Azure Function App to get RestAPI IoT data into Power BI for Visualization

Overview

This blog post details using a Powershell Azure Function App to get IoT data from a RestAPI and update a table in Power BI with that data for visualization.

The data can come from anywhere, however in the case of this post I’m getting the data from WioLink IoT Sensors. This builds upon my previous post here that details using Powershell to get environmental information and put it in Power BI.  Essentially the major change is to use a TimerTrigger Azure Function to perform the work and leverage the “serverless” Azure Functions model. No need for a reporting server or messing around with Windows scheduled tasks.

Prerequisites

The following are the prerequisites for this solution;

  • The Power BI Powershell Module
  • Register an application for RestAPI Access to Power BI
  • A Power BI Dataset ready for the data to go into
  • AzureADPreview Powershell Module

Create a folder on your local machine for the Powershell Modules then save the modules to your local machine using the powershell command ‘Save-Module” as per below.

Save-Module -Name PowerBIPS -Path C:\temp\PowerBI
Save-Module -Name AzureADPreview -Path c:\temp\AzureAD 

Create a Function App Plan

If you don’t already have a Function App Plan create one by searching for Function App in the Azure Management Portal. Give it a Name, Select Consumption Plan for the Hosting Plan so you only pay for what you use, and select an appropriate location and Storage Account.

Register a Power BI Application

Register a Power BI App if you haven’t already using the link and instructions in the prerequisites. Take a note of the ClientID. You’ll need this in the next step.

Configure Azure Function App Application Settings

In this example I’m using Azure Functions Application Settings for the Azure AD AccountName, Password and the Power BI ClientID. In your Azure Function App select “Configure app settings”. Create new App Settings for your UserID and Password for Azure (to access Power BI) and our PowerBI Application Client ID. Select Save.

Not shown here I’ve also placed the URL’s for the RestAPI’s that I’m calling to get the IoT environment data as Application Settings variables.

Create a Timer Trigger Azure Function App

Create a new TimerTrigger Azure Powershell Function App. The default of a 5 min schedule should be perfect. Give it a name and select Create.

Upload the Powershell Modules to the Azure Function App

Now that we have created the base of our Function App we’re going to need to upload the Powershell Modules we’ll be using that are detailed in the prerequisites. In order to upload them to your Azure Function App, go to App Service Settings => Deployment Credentials and set a Username and Password as shown below. Select Save.

Take note of your Deployment Username and FTP Hostname.

Create a sub-directory under your Function App named bin and upload the Power BI Powershell Module using a FTP Client. I’m using WinSCP.

To make sure you get the correct path to the powershell module from Application Settings start Kudu.

Traverse the folder structure to get the path to the Power BI Powershell Module and note the path and the name of the psm1 file.

Now upload the Azure AD Preview Powershell Module in the same way as you did the Power BI Powershell Module.

Again using Kudu validate the path to the Azure AD Preview Powershell Module. The file you are looking for is the Microsoft.IdentityModel.Clients.ActiveDirectory.dll” file. My file after uploading is located in “D:\home\site\wwwroot\MyAzureFunction\bin\AzureADPreview\2.0.0.33\Microsoft.IdentityModel.Clients.ActiveDirectory.dll”

This library is used by the Power BI Powershell Module.

Validating our Function App Environment

Update the code to replace the sample from the creation of the Trigger Azure Function as shown below to import the Power BI Powershell Module. Include the get-help line for the module so we can see in the logs that the modules were imported and we can see the cmdlets they contain. Select Save and Run.

Below is my output. I can see the output from the Power BI Module get-help command. I can see that the module was successfully loaded.

Function Application Script

Below is my sample script. It has no error handling etc so isn’t production ready, but gives a working example of getting data in from an API (in this case IoT sensors) and puts the data directly into Power BI.

Viewing the data in Power BI

In Power BI it is then quick and easy to select our Inside and Outside temperature readings referenced against time. This timescale is overnight so both sensors are reading quite close to each other.

Summary

This shows how easy it is to utilise Powershell and Azure Function Apps to get data and transform it for use in other ways. In this example a visualization of IoT data into Power BI. The input could easily be business data from an API and the output a real time reporting dashboard.

Follow Darren on Twitter @darrenjrobinson

 

 

 

 

Using an Azure Function to search the FIM/MIM Metaverse, create a Set and update the Set membership in the the FIM/MIM Service

Introduction

This is the third and last post in this series of integrating Microsoft Identity Manager with Azure Functions.

The first detailed how to use an Azure Function to retrieve data from the MIM Service Server. The second detailed how to use an Azure Function to retrieve data from the MIM Sync (Metaverse) Server.

This third post combines the two and then performs an action in the MIM Service. The practical purpose of this could be functions like “find all users in location y” and “enable them for entitlement x” or “add an attribute value on each of their objects”.

Overview

The reasoning for the two stage approach is that in my experience it is a lot easier to search the Metaverse than the MIM Service to find an object(s), but also the Metaverse has all the information about objects whereas the MIM Service is a ShadowVerse of the Metaverse containing a subset of the managed objects metadata.

Moving forward then the architecture is a hybrid of the first two posts that introduced the concepts associated with integrating MIM with Azure Functions. As per the other two posts this is a base working example and concept.

Prerequisites

The prerequisites are the same as for the 1st and 2nd posts in this series. You’ll need to work through those examples to setup the dependencies and prerequisites. From there you can create one more Azure Function that brings everything together. That’s what I’m covering in this post.

Therefore the prerequisites are;

  • Azure Tenant and a Function Plan
  • Microsoft Identity Manager implementation
  • Remote Powershell configured for your MIM Sync Server
  • Lithnet FIM MIIS Automation Powershell Module installed on your MIM Sync Server
  • The necessary Firewall Rules on your MIM Sync Server and your Azure Network Security Group (assuming your MIM Infrastructure is in Azure) to allow Azure Functions to communicate with MIM Sync and Service Servers

This Example performs the following

In this example the HTTP Trigger Azure Function;

  • Takes input for ObjectType, Attribute, AttributeValue, SetName
  • Searches the MIM Sync Metaverse for the input ObjectType, with the AttributeValue in the Attribute
  • Connects to the MIM Service
  • Creates the Set based of the input SetName if it doesn’t exist
  • Adds the objects from the search to the Set
  • Returns the objects added to the Set

In a real world implementation you’d do the above with a criteria based set. This post is a concept of search and find, performing a create and updating. That has many practical applications.

Create your new Azure Function

Just like the other two posts, we’re going to create a new Powershell HTTP Trigger Azure Function.

Upload the Lithnet RMA PS Module to your new Azure Function (as per blog post 1 in this series). You should also be using protected credentials now as well. So upload your username/password encryption key.

Here is the Azure Function Powershell Script that performs the process detailed above.

Test it out. Looks good. 88 users matched the value of Sydney in their location attribute.

Verify that the Set was created and the membership updated.

Test calling the Azure Function remotely

Now that it is all working in the Azure Function, lets try doing it from Powershell remotely. This time I’m again looking for Person objects that have Sydney in their location attribute and I’ll create a set named Sydney-NSW and put them in it.

Brilliant, that works nicely. Let’s verify that the Set was created and has the correct number of users in it. Yes, a perfect match.

Summary

Putting Azure Functions and Powershell together along with the Lithnet Powershell Modules opens up a world of possibilities for automation and integration of the MIM Service without the need for any additional infrastructure or any considerable effort.

Experiment and let me know what you do with this style of integration.

Follow Darren on Twitter @darrenjrobinson

Using Azure Functions with the Lithnet MIIS Automation Powershell Module to query your Microsoft Identity Manager Metaverse

This is the 2nd blog continuing on from this post which is an introduction to using Azure Functions with the Lithnet FIM/MIM Powershell Modules. If you haven’t read that one please do so to get up to speed before this one as it has more detail around the setup.

Overview

This post details similar functionality to the first post but with integration to the FIM/MIM Synchronisation Server and the FIM/MIM Metaverse rather than the FIM/MIM Service.

The solution is based around an Azure Function that;

  • takes a HTTP WebRequest that contains a payload with the ObjectType, AttributeName and AttributeValue to search for in the Metaverse
  • The Azure Function uses Remote Powershell to call the Lithnet MIIS Automation Powershell Module installed on the FIM/MIM Sync Server
  • The Lithnet Powershell Module takes the query from the Azure Function, executes the query and returns the result to the Azure Function and the requesting client
  • Note: My MIM Infrastructure is all located in Azure so there are configuration steps in this solution to allow access into my Azure environment. If your FIM/MIM infrastructure is elsewhere you’ll need to transpose the appropriate firewall rules for your architecture

Let’s get started.

Prerequisites

The prerequisites for this solution are;

  • An Azure Tenant
  • FIM/MIM Sync Server (as per the diagram above) with data in your Metaverse from a connected directory service (such as Active Directory)
  • I’ll also be using the awesome Lithnet MIIS Powershell Module from here for Microsoft FIM/MIM from Ryan Newington. A fantastic contribution to the FIM/MIM community
    • You’ll need to download and install it on your FIM/MIM Synchronisation Server. This differs from the Lithnet Module from the first post in this series as this one is specific to the Metaverse not the FIM/MIM Service.

Enable Powershell Remoting on the FIM/MIM Sync Server

On the FIM/MIM Sync Server where we will be sending requests from the Function App we need to enable Powershell Remoting. This is so we can leverage the Lithnet MIIS Automation Powershell module (that is a prerequisite to be installed on your FIM/MIM Sync Server).

On the FIM/MIM Synchronisation Server open Powershell (as Administrator) and execute the command  Enable-PSRemoting -Force 

 

Test from another server in your network that you can access the MIM Sync Server. I did this from my MIM Service Server.

 

PSRemote Inbound Security Rule (Azure NSG)

Using Powershell Remote means we need to have an incoming rule into the Azure Network where my MIM Sync Server is located to allow connections from Azure Functions to my MIM Sync Server. Create an Inbound Rule in your Azure Network Security Group for TCP Port 5986 as per the rule below.

 

Create a Self Signed Cert on the FIM/MIM Sync Server

To secure the connection using Remote Powershell we will secure the HTTPS connection with a certificate. This is because the Azure Function is not a member of the domain where your FIM/MIM Sync Server is located. In this example I’m using a self-signed certificate.

In Powershell (as Administrator) on your FIM/MIM Sync Server run the following command where the DNSName is the DNS name of your FIM/MIM Sync that will resolve from Azure Functions to your FIM/MIM Sync server.

New-SelfSignedCertificate -DnsName mymimsyncserver.westus.cloudapp.azure.com -CertStoreLocation Cert:\LocalMachine\My

Create a Remote Powershell HTTPS Listener

Copy the thumbprint from the self-signed certificate above and use it along with the DNS name of your FIM/MIM Sync Server to run the following command in an Administrator command prompt on your FIM/MIM Sync Server.

winrm create winrm/config/Listener?Address=*+Transport=HTTPS @{Hostname=”mymimsyncserver.westus.cloudapp.azure.com”;CertificateThumbp
rint=”536E41D6089F35ABCDEFD8C52BE754EFF0B279B”}

 

Allow Powershell Remote (HTTPS) through your firewall on your FIM/MIM Sync Server

In an Administrator command prompt run the following command to create a new inbound firewall rule for the Remote Powershell session from your Azure Function.

netsh advfirewall firewall add rule name="WinRM-HTTPS" dir=in localport=5986 protocol=TCP action=allow

Check that the new firewall rule was created successfully.

 

Create your HTTP Request Function

Create a new HTTP Trigger Function choosing Powershell as the language. More detailed steps to do this is in the first post in this series here.

Search FIM/MIM Metaverse Function App Script

Here is the base script to get you started. This differs a little from the first blog post example in that I’ve secured the username and password for connection to my MIM Sync Server. Details on how to do that are also linked to in the first blog post.

Also in this example I’m running Remote Powershell to execute the command on the FIM/MIM Sync Server as that is where the Lithnet MIIS Automation Powershell Module is installed and needs to run.

The following script;

  • Takes an HTTP request with Object Type, AttributeName, AttributeValue
  • It uses a Script Block to take the input variables from the HTTP request and perform a a Powershell Remote command (in this example Get-MVObject)
  • Returns the object to the output

Save the function once you’ve added the script (and updated it for your credentials, target FIM/MIM Sync Server etc).

Bring up the Test dialog and give the script some input values in the Request Body that will result in a successful query result from your Metaverse. Select Run. If you’ve done everything correctly you’ll see an object returned from the Metaverse.

Test the Function App

 

Execute the Azure Function from an HTTP Trigger

Now lets try it remotely. Here is a quick Powershell query to the Azure Function using the Powershell Invoke Rest Method using the same input to the Azure Function. And huzzah a returned object.

Summary

This concept provides a framework to allow a plethora of possibilities all possible through a combination of Azure Functions and the Lithnet MIIS Automation PS Module. The Lithnet MIIS PS Module provides all the functionality you get from being on the MIM Sync Server, but now you can retrieve information remotely or trigger functions remotely.

Follow Darren on Twitter @darrenjrobinson

 

 

 

Get Users/Groups/Objects from Microsoft/Forefront Identity Manager with Azure Functions and the Lithnet Resource Management Powershell Module

Introduction

As an Identity Management consultant if I had a $1 for every time I’ve been asked “what is user x’s current status in IDAM”, “is user x active?”, “does user x have an account in y?”, “what is user x’s primary email address?”, particularly after Go Live of an IDAM solution my holidays would be a lot more exotic.

From a Service Desk perspective IDAM implementations are often a black box in the middle of the network that for the most part do what they were designed and implemented to do. However as soon as something doesn’t look normal for a user the Service Desk are inclined to point their finger at that black box (IDAM Solution). And the “what is the current value of ..”, “does user x ..” type questions start flying.

What if we could give the Service Desk a simple query interface into FIM/MIM without needing to give them access to another complicated application?

This is the first (of potentially a series) blog post on leveraging community libraries and Azure PaaS services to provide visibility of FIM/MIM information. This first post really just introduces the concept with a working example in an easy way to understand and replicate. It is not intended for production implementation without additional security and optimisation. 

Overview

The following graphic shows the concept of using Azure Functions to take requests from a client (web app, powershell, some other script) query the FIM/MIM Service and return the result. This post details the setup and configuration for the section in the yellow shaded box with the process outlined in the numbers 1, 2 & 3. This post assumes you already have your FIM/MIM implementation setup and configured according to your connected integrated applications/services such as Active Directory. In my example my connected datasource is actually Twitter.

Prerequisites

The prerequisites for this solution are;

 

Creating your Azure App Service

First up you’ll need to create an Azure App Service in your Azure Tenant. To keep everything logically structured for this example I created an Azure App Service in the same resource group that contains my MIM IaaS infrastructure (MIM Sync Server, MIM Service Server, SQL Server, AD Domain Controller etc).

In the Azure Marketplace select New (+) and search for Function App. Select the Function App item from the results and select Create.

Give your Azure App Service a name, choose the Resource Group where you want to locate it. Choose Dynamic for the Hosting Plan. This means you don’t have to worry about resource management for your Web App and you only pay for execution time which unless you put this into production and have gone crazy with it your costs should be zero as they will (should) be well under the free grant tier.  Put the application in the appropriate location such as close to your FIM/MIM resources that it’ll be interacting with and select Create.

Now that you have your Azure App Service setup, you need to create your Azure Function.

Create an HTTP Trigger Powershell Function App

In the Azure Portal locate your App Services Blade and select the Function App created in the steps above. Mine was named MIMMetaverseSearch in the example above. Select PowerShell as the Language and HttpTrigger-Powershell as the Function type.

Give your Function a name. I’ve kept it simple in this example and named it the same as my App Service Plan. Select Create.

Adding the Lithnet Powershell Module into your Function App.

As you’d expect the Powershell Function App by default only has a handful of core Powershell Modules. As we’re using something pretty specific we’ll need put the module into our Function App so we can load it and use the library.

Download and save the Lithnet Resource Management Powershell Module to your local machine. Something like the Powershell command below will do that.

Next follow this great blog post here from Tao to upload the Lithnet RMA PS Module you downloaded earlier into your function directory. I used WinSCP as my FTP client as I’ve shown below to upload the Lithnet RMA PS Module.

FTP to the host for your App Service and navigate to the /site/wwwroot/

Create a bin folder and upload via FTP the Lithnet RMA PS Module.

Using Kudu navigate to the path and version of the Lithnet RMA PS Module.
I’m using v1.0.6088 and my app is named MIMMetaverseSearch so MY path is D:\home\site\wwwroot\MIMMetaverseSearch\bin\LithnetRMA\1.0.6088

Note: the Lithnet RMA PS Module is 64-bit so you’ll need to configure your Web App for 64-bit as per the info in the same blog you followed to upload the module here.

Test loading the Lithnet RMA PS Module in your Function App

In your Function App select </> Develop. Remove the sample script and in your first line import the Lithnet RMA PS Module using the path from the previous step. Then, to check that it loads add a line that references a cmdlet in the module. I used Help Get-Resource. Select Save then Run.

If you’ve done everything correct when you select Run and look at the Logs you’ll see the module was loaded and the Help Get-Resource command was run in the Logs.

Allow your Function App to access your FIM/MIM Service Server

Even though you have logically placed your Function App in the same Resource Group (if you did it like I have) you’ll need to actually allow the Function App that is running in a shared PaaS environment to connect to your FIM/MIM Service Server.

Create an inbound rule in your Network Security Group to allow access to your FIM/MIM Service Server. The example below isn’t as secure as it could (and should) be as it allows access from anywhere. You should restrict the source of the request(s) accordingly. I’m just showing how to quickly get a working example. TCP Port 5725 is required to access your MIM Service Server. Enter the details as per below and select Ok.

Using an Azure Function to query FIM/MIM Service

Note: Again, this is an example to quickly show the concept. In the script below your credentials are in the script in clear text (and of course those below are not valid). For anything other than validating the concept you must protect your credentials. A great example is available here in Tao’s post.

The PS Azure Function gets the incoming request and converts it from JSON. In my request which you’ll see in the next step I’m passing in “displayName” and “objectType”.

In this example I’m using Get-Resource from the Lithnet RMA to get an object from the FIM/MIM Service. First you need to open a connection to the FIM/MIM Service Server. On my Azure IaaS MIM Service Server I’ve configured a DNS name so you can see I’m using that name in line 17 to connect to it using the unsecured credentials from earlier in the script. If you haven’t set up a DNS name for your FIM/MIM Service Server you can use the Public IP Address instead.

Line 20 queries for the ObjectType and DisplayName passed into the Function (see calling the Function in the next step) and returns the response in line 22. Again this is just an example. There is no error checking, validation or anything. I’m just introducing the concept in this post.

Testing your Function App

Now that you have the function script saved, you can test it from the Function App itself. Select Test from the options up in the right from your function. Change the Request Body for what the Function is expecting. In my case displayname and objectType. Select Run and in the Logs if you’ve got everything configured correctly (like inbound network rules, DNS name, your FIM/MIM Service Server is online, your query is for a valid resource) you should see an object returned.

Calling the Function App from a Client

Now that we have our Function App all setup and configured (and tested in the Function App) let’s send a request to the Azure Function using the Powershell Invoke-RestMethod function. The following call I did from my laptop. It is important to note that there is no authN in this example and the function app will be using whatever credentials you gave it to execute the request. In a deployed solution you’ll need to scope who can make the requests, limit on the inbound network rules who can submit requests and of course further protect the account credentials used to connect to your FIM/MIM Service Server.

Successful Response

The following screenshot shows calling the Function App and getting the responding object. Success. In a couple of lines I created a hashtable for the request, converted it to JSON and submitted it and got a response. How powerful is that!?

Summary

Using the awesome Lithnet Resource Management PowerShell Module with Azure Functions it is pretty quick and flexible to access a wealth of information we may want to expose for business benefit.

Now if only there was an affiliation program for Azure Functions that could deposit funds for each IDAM request to an Azure Functions App into my holiday fund.

Stay tuned for more posts on taking this concept to the next level.

Follow Darren on Twitter @darrenjrobinson

Leveraging the PowerBI Beta API for creating PowerBI Tables with Relationships via PowerShell

If anyone actually reads my posts you will have noticed that I’ve been on a bit of a deep dive into PowerBI and how I can use it to provide visualisation of data from Microsoft Identity Manager (here via CSV, and here via API). One point I noticed going direct to PowerBI via the API (v1.0) though was how it is not possible to provide relationships (joins) between tables within datasets (you can via PowerBI Desktop). After a lot of digging and searching I’ve worked out how to actually define the relationships between tables in a dataset via the API and PowerShell. This post is about that.

Overview

In order to define relationships between tables in a dataset (via the API), there are a couple of key points to note:

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/76015/BlogImages/PowerBIRelationships/BetaAPI-DataSets.PNG

  • You’ll need to modify the PowerBIPS PowerShell Module to leverage the Beta API
    • see the screenshot in the “How to” section

Prerequisites

To use PowerBI via PowerShell and the PowerBI API you’ll need to get:

How to leverage the PowerBI Beta API

In addition to the prerequisites above, in order to leverage the PowerShell PowerBI module for the PowerBI Beta API I just changed the beta flag $True in the PowerBI PowerShell (PowerBIPS.psm1) module to make all calls on the Beta API. See screenshot below. It will probably be located somewhere like ‘C:\Program Files\WindowsPowerShell\Modules\PowerBIPS

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/76015/BlogImages/PowerBIRelationships/PowerBIPS-BetaAPI.PNG

Example Dataset Creation

The sample script below will create a New Dataset in  PowerBI with two tables. Each table holds “Internet of Things” environmental data. One for data from an Seeed WioLink IoT device located outside and one inside. Both tables contain a column with DateTime that is extracted before the sensors are read and then their data added to their respective tables referencing that DateTime.

That is where the ‘relationships‘ part of the schema comes in. The options for the direction of the relationship filter are OneDirection (default), BothDirections and Automatic. For this simple example I’m using OneDirection on DateTime.

To put some data into the tables here is my simple script. I only have a single IoT unit hooked up so I’m fudging the more constant Indoor Readings. The Outside readings are coming from a Seeed WioLink unit.

Visualisation

So there we have it. Something I thought would have been part of the minimum viable product (MVP) release of the API is available in the Beta and using PowerShell we can define relationships between tables in a dataset and use that in our visualisation.

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/76015/BlogImages/PowerBIRelationships/PowerBI-Env%20Visual-2.PNG

Follow Darren on Twitter @darrenjrobinson